A Pill a Day Will Keep an Unintended Pregnancy Away!

What is the birth control pill?

The birth control pill (also called “the Pill”) is a birth control method that includes a combination of an estrogen (estradiol) and progestogen (progestin) to prevent pregnancy. If taken correctly, the pill is a very effective (meaning it works really well) at preventing pregnancy. Although there a lot of different types of pills, they all work the same way. They vary by brand or by the amount of hormones in them. If you are interested in the pill, talk to your clinician about which one might be the best option for you. And if you’ve tried the pill before and didn’t like it for a reason other than forgetting to take it, talk to your clinician about the other types of pills available.

PrintThere is a pill that is progestin only – called the mini pill. The mini pill has slightly different instructions than what is listed below. If you are using the mini pill, please discuss proper usage instructions with your clinician or pharmacist.

How does the birth control pill work?

The pill works by “telling” the ovaries not to release an egg (called ovulation). If no egg is released, there is nothing for sperm to fertilize (the fertilization of an egg by sperm results in pregnancy). However, if a pill is forgotten or missed the ovaries don’t get the message (and may release an egg) making pregnancy possible if there has been recent unprotected sex (sex without a condom).

ovulation-period-920270

How to use the birth control pill:

The birth control pill is most effective (works the best) when taken every day around the same time of day – the first week is especially important. A typical pill pack has 28 pills – 21 of those pills contain hormones and the other 7 do not. It’s during those 7 non-hormonal pills that most women get their period (however, some women may or may not bleed the entire 7 days). Regardless of whether or not you are still bleeding, start a new pack only when the 7 days of non-hormonal pills are complete. No sooner and no later.

ocp_instructions

*Every pack looks a bit different. Some are round. Some are square. Some are rectangular. Make sure you talk to your clinician or pharmacist about which pills are the active pills (the pills with hormones) and which are the non-active pills (the non-hormonal pills taken during the week in which you can expect your period). Also, not everyone starts their new pack on a Sunday. Whatever day you choose to start, be sure it’s the same day every month (meaning, if you start a new pack on Tuesday, every new pack thereafter will start on a Tuesday).

What to do if a pill or two are missed:

It’s common to forget a pill from time to time (if you forget often, you might want to consider switching birth control methods). Knowing what to do if that happens can help prevent an unplanned pregnancy. Here are some general instructions on what to do if you forget a pill or two.

Forget

Number of Pills Missed

When Pills Missed

What to do …

 “Should I use condoms?

First 1 pill

Beginning of pack 

  • Take a pill as soon as you remember.
  • Take the next pill at the usual time.

(This means you may take two pills in one day.)

Yes, use condoms for 1 week.

 

1 pills

First week of pack

  • Take a pill as soon as you remember.
  • Take the next pill at the usual time.

(This means you may take two pills in one day.) 

Yes, use condoms for 1 week.

2 pills

2nd and 3rd week of pack

  • Take 2 pills 2 days in a row

For example, if you forget pills on Monday & Tuesday, you would take 2 pills on Wednesday & 2 pills on Thursday.

No

3 or more pills

Any time in pack

  • Do not finish pack. Throw away remaining pills.
  • Start next pack.*

*If you use Family Pact, you can only pick up 3 packs of pills every 3 months. If you throw away a pack and start a new one because of missed pills, you will not have enough pills/packs to last until your next refill. If this is the case, please call New Generation Health Center. We have pills on site that we can give to you.

Yes, use condoms for 1st week of new pack.

I know this was A LOT of information. If you have any questions, you are always welcome to comment, send an email to askshawna@yahoo.com, call or make an appointment at New Gen (415.502.8336).

In happiness & health,

Shawna

Reviewed by Kohar Der Simonian, MD